Student Photos from my Week-long Kolkata Introduction to Design/Composition Street Photography Workshop

1x1.trans Student Photos from my Week long Kolkata Introduction to Design/Composition Street Photography Workshop

Photograph by Nick Lorkin from the Kolkata Introduction to Design/Composition Workshop

After an exciting and action-packed week, the Kolkata Introduction to Design/Composition Street Photography Workshop has come to an end! Unfortunately Adam was not able to join and teach, but me, Mikael, and Nick had a great time in the colorful streets of Kolkata.

For the workshop we focused on a different theme everyday, starting off the day with lecture/theory – and spending the rest of the day shooting. I am both amazed and impressed how much Mikael and Nick were able to improve during the week. Both in their photography and confidence shooting in the streets! One great thing that both of them did was when photographing the locals of Kolkata, they talked to them, laughed with them, and best of all – shared their photos with them (albeit only on the back of their LCD screens).

1x1.trans Student Photos from my Week long Kolkata Introduction to Design/Composition Street Photography Workshop

Photograph by Mikael Laurson from the Kolkata Introduction to Design/Composition Workshop

The first 3 days they shot in black and white, and the last 2 days they shot in color. An overview of the week:

  • Day 1: Diagonals
  • Day 2: Figure-to-ground
  • Day 3: Depth
  • Day 4: Color
  • Day 5: Anything Goes

To see snapshots from the workshop and their before/after shots- read on!

Snapshots from the Workshop

1x1.trans Student Photos from my Week long Kolkata Introduction to Design/Composition Street Photography Workshop

Mikael sharing his photos with the locals

1x1.trans Student Photos from my Week long Kolkata Introduction to Design/Composition Street Photography Workshop

Nick sharing his photo of some girls he took a portrait of in Kolkata

1x1.trans Student Photos from my Week long Kolkata Introduction to Design/Composition Street Photography Workshop

Me posing with some of the locals – asian style.

Mikael’s Photos Before the Workshop

1x1.trans Student Photos from my Week long Kolkata Introduction to Design/Composition Street Photography Workshop

1x1.trans Student Photos from my Week long Kolkata Introduction to Design/Composition Street Photography Workshop

1x1.trans Student Photos from my Week long Kolkata Introduction to Design/Composition Street Photography Workshop

1x1.trans Student Photos from my Week long Kolkata Introduction to Design/Composition Street Photography Workshop

1x1.trans Student Photos from my Week long Kolkata Introduction to Design/Composition Street Photography Workshop

 

Mikael’s Photos From the Kolkata Design/Composition Workshop

Day 1: Diagonals

1x1.trans Student Photos from my Week long Kolkata Introduction to Design/Composition Street Photography Workshop

Day 2: Figure-to-ground

1x1.trans Student Photos from my Week long Kolkata Introduction to Design/Composition Street Photography Workshop

Day 3: Depth
1x1.trans Student Photos from my Week long Kolkata Introduction to Design/Composition Street Photography Workshop

Day 4: Color

1x1.trans Student Photos from my Week long Kolkata Introduction to Design/Composition Street Photography Workshop

Day 5: Anything Goes

1x1.trans Student Photos from my Week long Kolkata Introduction to Design/Composition Street Photography Workshop

Nick’s Photos Before the Workshop

1x1.trans Student Photos from my Week long Kolkata Introduction to Design/Composition Street Photography Workshop

1x1.trans Student Photos from my Week long Kolkata Introduction to Design/Composition Street Photography Workshop

1x1.trans Student Photos from my Week long Kolkata Introduction to Design/Composition Street Photography Workshop

1x1.trans Student Photos from my Week long Kolkata Introduction to Design/Composition Street Photography Workshop

1x1.trans Student Photos from my Week long Kolkata Introduction to Design/Composition Street Photography Workshop

Nick’s Photos From the Kolkata Design/Composition Workshop

Day 1: Diagonals

1x1.trans Student Photos from my Week long Kolkata Introduction to Design/Composition Street Photography Workshop

Day 2: Figure-to-ground

1x1.trans Student Photos from my Week long Kolkata Introduction to Design/Composition Street Photography Workshop

Day 3: Depth

1x1.trans Student Photos from my Week long Kolkata Introduction to Design/Composition Street Photography Workshop

Day 4: Color

1x1.trans Student Photos from my Week long Kolkata Introduction to Design/Composition Street Photography Workshop

Day 5: Anything Goes

1x1.trans Student Photos from my Week long Kolkata Introduction to Design/Composition Street Photography Workshop

You can also see Mikael and Nick’s photos on my Facebook fan page here.

If you are interested in breaking out of your comfort zone and taking your street photography to the next level, experience one of my future workshops. You can see my upcoming schedule here.

Upcoming Street Photography Workshops

If you want to conquer your fears and meet new peers, join me in Stockholm, Portland, San Francisco, Chicago, Toronto, NYC, Istanbul & More!

See My Upcoming Street Photography Workshops

  • Hater/ Troll

    Instead of refining their natural style ( which as a teacher you should have done) you have moulded them into a style that is at present being followed by not less than 100000 photographers worldwide. Kudos!

    • http://erickimphotography.com/blog Eric Kim

      Hi Hater/Troll,

      Thanks for the comment!

      I find style to be something less aesthetic and more of how you see the world, how you approach people, and what interests you in life.

      When it comes to design/composition, I find it to be more mathematical and grounded in the history of art – that many photographers all around the world employ.

      And at the end of the day, it was them clicking the shutter- not me. And for that I am proud of how they were able to overcome their mental obstacles and get solid shots for each lesson during the week. For shooting there only a week, I am incredibly proud of their progress :)

      • Hater/ Troll

        “I find style to be something less aesthetic and more of how you see the
        world, how you approach people, and what interests you in life.”
        I am surprised you know that. Even after knowing, you are churning out clones from your factory?
        When it comes to design/composition, there are people in every nook and corner of the world that will teach what you have taught them. Your students could have just joined their neighborhood camera club and learned all those stuff. There was no need to fly thousands of miles and spend thousands of dollars.
        No need to be proud of their progress, because they haven’t progressed at all. You have blinded them.

        • Guest

          “When it comes to design/composition, there are people in every nook and corner of the world that will teach what you have taught them. Your students could have just joined their neighborhood camera club and learned all those stuff. There was no need to fly thousands of miles and spend thousands of dollars.”

          Perhaps. And that applies for most things in life, I guess. But I’m sure it’s way more fun and inspiring to combine a learning experience with exotic travel.

          “No need to be proud of their progress, because they haven’t progressed at all. You have blinded them.”

          I do realise that you must project a lot of your own wishful thinking onto EK given the considerable amount of time and energy you spend in getting upset about him (google ‘psychological projection’). You shouldn’t overdo it, though. He’s just a regular bloke teaching people how to move out of their comfort zone when photographing the streets. Not an evil mastermind able to brainwash people for years to come…

          • Hater/ Troll

            “He’s just a regular bloke teaching people how to move out of their comfort zone when photographing the streets.”
            On the contrary, i consider his activities more dangerous than Mao Zedong’s Cultural Revolution. We shall have to agree to disagree.

    • http://www.facebook.com/charlie.kirk Charlie Kirk

      Hmmm. I don’t think either of the photographers had a “natural style”. And Eric has not moulded them into one particular style, he has simply given them differing tasks to do over the few days. Presumably these tasks would have taught the students what to look for going forward and a style might, if they are incredibly lucky, talented and work hard, develop.

      • Hater/ Troll

        They were, before the workshop, seeing the world in their own way, that was their “natural style”. In Street Photography, style had traditionally been content based, not form based. Even Eric has agreed to that in his comment below.
        Unfortunately, Eric has changed their way of seeing the world.

        • http://www.facebook.com/charlie.kirk Charlie Kirk

          A “natural style”? They may have been taking photos naturally, but to say that either photographer had a style is ill conceived. Finding a style is something incredibly difficult, and by working through different exercises, it becomes easier to work out what type of pictures you like, are able to pull off, feel comfortable taking etc. If they see the world differently that can only be a positive thing. Maybe, after a few years of reading photography books and practicing taking photos in different ways, a unique style might emerge. Without knowing what has come before and what are the different “types” of street photo, it is not possible to develop a style – ie you might think you are being unique, but the chances are that your pictures are generic.

          I also do not believe that style is only about content. It is a function of focal length, processing, use or not of flash, type of photograph AND content.

          Please, if you are going to offer up opinions it would be helpful if you could do so by giving your name. That way people would know whether you have the credentials to opine on such issues. My feeling is that you don’t. `

          • Hater/ Troll

            Let’s not waste any more time barrister Kirk.

            Before going, let me clarify, by natural style i mean how you see the world, not taking photos naturally.

            If you read my opening post once again, you will see i wrote – ‘instead of refining their…”. I have used the word refine.

            Style is about how you see the world, not how you take photos. That’s of course me.

            I don’t remember exactly where, but somewhere in his blog Nick Turpin once wrote – if you give a camera to a child and tell him to go out and shoot the first photo that child takes will be a street photograph. It’s upto you how you will interpret this opinion.

            I’d also like to share an interesting letter from Stephen Shore to a young artist-

            Dear Young Artist,

            Yes, I think you can do both, participate in the art world
            and maintain your integrity. But your success in doing it depends on your
            relationship to your art.

            I’ve been teaching at Bard College for more than twenty
            years. I’ve also had the opportunity to meet graduate students at several
            institutions over the years. More and more, I see students who are driven by a
            desire to have a show in Chelsea and be a successful artist. Certainly not all
            students, but I’ve seen a definite shift.

            This is understandable, of course. However, for me, it has
            little to do with why I make art. I believe that art is made to explore the
            world and the culture, to explore the chosen medium, to explore one’s self. It
            is made to communicate, in the medium’s language, a perception, an observation,
            an understanding, an emotional or mental state. It is made to answer, or try to
            answer, questions. It is made for fun. In short, it is made in response to
            personal needs and demands.

            A student might see a great work of art and say to himself,
            “This is a great work of art. I want to make a great work of art,
            too.” And so, the student sets out to try to do so. And if he has some
            talent, he might produce something that looks just as though it were a work of
            art — almost convincing. If one didn’t know any better one might actually
            mistake it for a work of art. The only problem is that the great work of art
            that the student so admired was not a product of these same motives. It was the
            by product of the artist’s personal quest.

            Having ambition is not a problem. In fact, ambition is
            necessary to be able to carve out the time needed to produce your work from the
            multitude of other demands on your life. The question is how that ambition is
            directed. If you adhere to your personal path, having shows and sales will not
            do any harm. In fact, you might actually make enough money to live, even live
            well. There’s nothing at all wrong with that. The problem comes when the market
            begins to influence your motives and decisions. If your work needs to evolve
            and change, it may mean abandoning an approach that brought you recognition.

            Of course, you do want to establish your voice as an artist
            and to, as you put it, “develop a true sense of self.” But if you
            wait until you know you’ve finally found it, you may never have a show. Finding
            your voice may be a process, not a goal. I have students who start studying
            photography in college and tell me that they want to “express
            themselves.” I think to myself, “You’re only eighteen, how can you
            express yourself when you don’t know yourself?” But that shouldn’t deter
            them. In learning and practicing an art, they may embark on the path of finding
            themselves.

            I have one final thought to add. In doing so, I may be
            misjudging you and doing you a disservice. But I sense from the tone of your
            letter that you may be using your moral dilemma as an excuse for not engaging in
            your work and that you are using your vulnerability to deflect criticism from
            me. Cut it out!

            Good luck and best wishes,

            Stephen Shore Tivoli, New York

            Best Regards, you won’t see me here any more.

  • Mr Gubrz

    ooooh i LOVE mikaels preworkshop #3
    i wish u could see more of the woman on the left tho, but NICE!

  • G

    You did a 5 day workshop, all the way over in India, with two students and that covers you expenses plus allows you to make a living? Out of curiosity: what did it cost to attend?

    • http://erickimphotography.com/blog Eric Kim

      Hey G- for the workshop I charged 1500 USD for 5 days.

      Like you mentioned after flights, accommodation, and travel expenses- I actually lost money teaching the workshop. I had all 6 spots full initially, but unfortunately many had to drop out last-minute due to family obligations or unseen circumstances. But certainly it is my obligation to still show up and teach. Wouldn’t want to just cancel the workshop last-minute because not enough students are attending! After all, Nick and Mikael paid for their flights and accommodation in Kolkata already for the week.

      However I teach workshops as a passion and for the love of it! :) I’m lucky enough that the Samsung gig I did with the NX20 and Galaxy Note 2 made me enough money to help me get by for a few months.

      • G

        Unfortunate that you lost money on it, good for Nick and Mikael that you still went through with it.

        • http://erickimphotography.com/blog Eric Kim

          Yeah, I am glad I went through with it and very pleased to see how much they were able to progress in such a short period of time! :)

  • http://twitter.com/slicelondonlife Slice of London Life

    I love the changes in their photos from pre workshop to those they took during the workshop. I like the composition of the depth and diagonals. It’s something I’m going to try. And just looking for colour is a great idea too.

  • sup

    holy crap I really don’t know why people troll/hate on you Eric. Of course there are things that I myself and others will disagree on with you, but that is no reason to consistently hate on you and your posts on YOUR BLOG. You’re doing you are passionate about, and showing others how to appreciate photography, and for that, I can only sit back and watch/learn. Mr. troll/hater is acting like you’re the anti-Christ or something.

    • Hater/ Troll

      Only time will tell bro….only time will tell

  • Pingback: black white